How is the protagonist's gradual awareness of his own condition is presented in "The Dead Man"? What is the style of this short story?

In "The Dead Man," Quiroga uses a third-person limited point of view to convey the protagonist's awareness of his condition. The narrator presents the man's thoughts and changing impressions of his hopeless situation. Visual imagery initially plays an important role as the dying man sees that the machete has impaled him. As the story progresses, the man becomes more introspective and less concerned with his physical environment, but he finally looks with great interest at his body on the ground.

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In his story “The Dead Man,” Horacio Quiroga follows the changing thought processes of the protagonist as he accepts the fact that he has had a fatal accident. Through most of the story, Quiroga employs a single third-person limited-perspective narrator. This narrator provides the protagonist’s thoughts as he...

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In his story “The Dead Man,” Horacio Quiroga follows the changing thought processes of the protagonist as he accepts the fact that he has had a fatal accident. Through most of the story, Quiroga employs a single third-person limited-perspective narrator. This narrator provides the protagonist’s thoughts as he slips and falls, then lies silently on the ground. At the very end, the narrative perspective, while still limited, switches to the horse’s point of view.

Along with his overall narrative strategy, Quiroga uses imagery to convey the man’s changing awareness of his condition. The narrator continually offers the man’s thoughts, but early in the story, offers visual images of the man’s situation. The man first sees with satisfaction at the results of his labor in tending to his banana fields. After he slips, this quickly switches to him looking at his own body, grotesquely impaled by the machete.

As the man continues to lie there helplessly, the emphasis switches to his contemplating and doubting his situation. While he resists admitting that he is dying, he thinks about normal everyday tasks that he plans to do. As it sinks in that he cannot get up and move, or even shout for help, his mental state assumes the larger share of the narrative. Knowing the answer is “No,” he asks himself if this is not a normal day.

In the penultimate paragraph, the emphasis on visual imagery is resumed. The man envisions the landscape he knows so well but cannot actually see because he cannot move his head. The narrator mentions a vantage point from above, implying that the man’s spirit has left his body, which he observes as a “bundle” below.

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