How is the girl described by the narrator in "Araby"?

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The narrator describes the girl, who is the sister of his friend Mangan, in terms that reflect his infatuation with her.

She wears a dress that is loose enough to swing in rhythm with her body. She has a "soft rope" of hair that moves from side to side as...

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The narrator describes the girl, who is the sister of his friend Mangan, in terms that reflect his infatuation with her.

She wears a dress that is loose enough to swing in rhythm with her body. She has a "soft rope" of hair that moves from side to side as the narrator watches her. The girl is a "brown figure" whom the narrator searches for each morning as he lays on the floor in his own front parlor, watching her door for a sign of her emergence.

Eventually, she and the narrator share a conversation about his plans to attend the bazaar in Araby, and the narrator notices that she wears a silver bracelet, which she constantly spins around her wrist. He also observes the way the light catches the "white curve of her neck" and makes visible the "white border of a petticoat" underneath her dress.

It is in these little details of her appearance and the narrator's awed tone as he conveys those details that his admiration of Mangan's sister is made clear.

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