How is the cat's progress of justifying stealing the fish quite similar to the human characteristics of rationalizing in I Am a Cat?

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On page 24, the cat says he gets back at a "servant-woman" who keeps throwing him out of the house by sneaking in one more time and eating her dinner of mackerel-pike. Like a human, he rationalizes the theft by stating that, first, he was cold and hungry, and so...

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On page 24, the cat says he gets back at a "servant-woman" who keeps throwing him out of the house by sneaking in one more time and eating her dinner of mackerel-pike. Like a human, he rationalizes the theft by stating that, first, he was cold and hungry, and so therefore it was his animal right to help himself to the food, and secondly, he claims that the woman deserved it. If she had been kinder to him, he wouldn't have felt the need to seek his revenge and eat her dinner. It is reminiscent of when humans commit crimes on the basis that they (the criminal) are the victim and that the person they are stealing from is at least partly responsible for their bad luck.

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