How is propaganda used in Old Major's speech and throughout the novella?

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Propaganda is usually defined as information which is biased or misleading and designed to convince or manipulate people to believe a given point of view. Arguably, Old Major's speech at the beginning of the novel is neither biased nor misleading, although it is certainly designed to convince the animals of a given point of view.

Old Major uses various language techniques to try to convince the animals that they need to unite and overthrow their human oppressors. For example, he uses rhetorical questions such as when he asks the animals, "what is the nature of this life of ours?" Referring to the "misery and slavery" of their lives, Old Major also asks the animals, "is this simply part of the order of nature?" A rhetorical question can be an effective tool of persuasion because it implies an answer that appears obvious. The implied answer to the first rhetorical question is that the nature of the animals' lives is, as Old Major has already suggested, "misery and slavery." The implied...

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