How is parallelism used in Jonathan Edwards's "Sinners in the Hand of an Angry God"?

Parallelism is used in Jonathan Edwards's “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” to strengthen the force of the sermon's argument. In one passage where parallelism is used, Edwards tells his audience that even if their strength were ten thousand times greater than it is, they would still not be able to withstand the wrath of God.

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Parallelism is used in “Sinners of an Angry God” primarily as a means of driving home the sermon's main point: that God can, and will, consign to Hell anyone he so chooses at any time. The repeated grammatical structures that parallelism involves have the effect of sending home a message and, in so doing, giving it greater power. A message given once in the course of a speech would almost certainly not have the same effect or anything like it. But as the message of Edwards's sermon is so important, it needs to be asserted again and again, and this is where parallelism comes in useful.

In one particularly powerful passage, Edwards reminds his audience that if

your strength were ten thousand times greater than it is, yea, ten thousand times greater than the strength of the stoutest, sturdiest devil in hell,

it would not be enough to withstand God's terrible wrath.

What Edwards is doing here is to make clear once again the relative insignificance of humanity by comparison with the Almighty. No...

(The entire section contains 3 answers and 825 words.)

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