How is love treated in poetry from the Elizabethan Age?

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“You don’t believe in the love that corrodes, the love that ruins?”

“No,” laughed Zuleika.

“You have never dipped into the Greek pastoral poets, nor sampled the Elizabethan sonneteers?”

“No, never. You will think me lamentably crude: my experience of life has been drawn from life itself.”

The above quotation, from Sir Max Beerbohm's Zuleika Dobson, gives a necessarily cursory and one-dimensional, but not entirely inaccurate, flavor of Elizabethan poetry as concerning itself with the more tragic and painful...

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