How is language learned, according to the Behaviorist theory of language acquisition?

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"Language acquisition" refers to the process of learning a language, although behaviorist ideas of language acquisition specifically seek to understand how people learn their native language, while only being more generally applicable to foreign language learning.

Because behaviorists frame language as a behavior, they argue that the process of language acquisition, for an infant, is similar to the process of learning other behaviors. Infants mimic the behaviors they see other people model, and correct imitation is rewarded by other people in their environment, allowing for these successes to...

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The behaviorist theory of language acquisition states that language is learned when the meaning of certain words are internalized because of the response received when the words are spoken. For example, when a child says the word "ball," and someone gives them a ball, they will come to know the object given to them as a ball. This theory of language development is a component of behavioral theory. Behavioral theory was founded by J. B. Watson and included many elements of human development. Followers of this language theory believe that children, and perhaps those learning another language, mimic the words said by people around them in an effort to receive something in return.
"The major principle of the behaviorist theory rests on the analyses of human behavior in observable stimulus-response interaction and the association between them."
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