How is Ernest Hemingway's short story "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" a reflection of modernism in terms of its style and content?

Hemingway's story can be considered modernist in its use of stream of consciousness and in its theme of the alienation of the individual from society.

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As others have noted, the stream-of-consciousness style Hemingway uses in "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" is associated with modernism. It's important to note, however, that stream-of-consciousness is not used by modernist writers simply as window dressing but comes from a deep desire to express their belief that knowledge is subjective, not objective. These writers, as Hemingway does, almost entirely dispense with the omniscient, all-knowing narrator because they didn't want to inject false certainty into their narratives. Instead, we see the action in the story in subjective terms as it is experienced by a dying man.

Hemingway also uses the spare, unembellished prose typical of the modernists, who wanted to get away from Victorian ornamentation.

In his treatment of a story about dying, Hemingway is strikingly modernist. Victorians loved sentimental and religious deathbed scenes, something modernists turned away from. Like a good modernist, Hemingway strips Harry's death of any false...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 854 words.)

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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on October 16, 2020
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Last Updated by eNotes Editorial on October 16, 2020