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How influential was Julius Caesar historically?

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One needs only glance through a calendar to be reminded of this great Roman ruler: the month of July reminds us of this great Roman, as well. For, it was he who revised previous calendars and added two month in the middle so that the seasons would fall at the...

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One needs only glance through a calendar to be reminded of this great Roman ruler: the month of July reminds us of this great Roman, as well. For, it was he who revised previous calendars and added two month in the middle so that the seasons would fall at the same times each year. Caesar also lengthend the number of days in the year from 355 to 365; however, this calendar miscalculated the solar system by eleven minutes. Because these few minutes threw off the calendar, after 1582, the Gregorian calendar that followed fixed the discrepancy by adopting the use of leap years.

Certainly, by the fact that the name of Julius Caesar is yet familiar to people around the globe, underscores the significance of Caesar as a figure in history. His great expansion of the Roman empire brought with it aqueducts, roads, walls, military tactics and ways of government that are yet evident in many European countries. For instance, Julius Caesar encouraged entertainment for all people, and he had some entitlement programs that fed the poor. Caesar also provided the plebians access to the newspapers that heretofore were only available to noblemen (these "newspapers" were engraved in stone). So, there are strategies that Caesar used which are still in use today in some governments. On the other side, Caesar's abuse of power stands as a model that modern leaders should learn from lest they suffer a familiar fate as he. After Caesar's death Cicero Stated this about Caesar,

"Our tyrant deserved to die. Here was a man who wanted to be king of the Roman people and master of the whole world. Those who agree with an ambition like this must also accept the destruction of existing laws and freedoms. It is not right or fair to want to be king in a state that used to be free and ought to be free today."  

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