How is imagery used in Tom Hardy's poem, "Hap"?

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bohemianteacher4u | College Teacher | (Level 3) Assistant Educator

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Tom Hardy's poem, "Hap," relies on the use of imagery to enable the reader to visualize grief. Hardy speculates on his life and grieves the way things have turned out.

Hardy presents the reader with a laughing god in the sky. The reader looks at these words and creates a mental picture of god laughing above.

"From up the sky and laugh.."

The response to seeing god laughing is the body of the person clenching and the person beginning to cry tears. The words evoke an image of the person doubled over in emotional pain and crying.

"clenched myself.."

Hardy then presents joy as a victim slain. By personifying joy, Hardy provides a visual perspective of joy as a person perhaps cut down by a sword and lying on the ground dead.

He goes on in the poem to create a picture of seeds that never blossom as a representation of the hope lost.

"And why unblooms the best hope ever sworn?"

Once again, imagery is used to show the sun and rain being blocked because of the barriers in life that have resulted in Hardy's feelings of woe.  Hardy addresses his pilgrimage, which is visualized as a trip, but the pilgrimage is the various transitions through-out his life.

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