Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

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How are the homes in Wuthering Heights represented?

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The importance of the two homes in this novel is very significant, as they both act to help elucidate the conflict that occurs between raw, elemental nature and civilisation. If we start off by considering Wuthering Heights as a house, its location is tremendously important as it is situated on an exposed part of the moor and is therefore open to all of the force of the elements. Note what Lockwood tells us about the physical description of the house in Chapter 1:

'Wuthering' being a significant provincial adjective, descriptive of the atmospheric tumult to which its station is exposed in stormy weather. Pure, bracing ventilation they must have up there at all times, indeed: one may guess the power of the north wind blowing over the edge, by the excessive slant of a few stunted firs at the end of the house; and by a range of gaunt thorns all stretching their limbs one way, as if craving alms of the sun. Happily, the architect had foresight to build it strong: the narrow windows are deeply...

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