How have Anne's plans for the future changed throughout The Diary of Anne Frank?

Anne's plans for the future change as she recognizes how much she enjoys writing and realizes that she also has a talent for it. She is determined to be a journalist one day and perhaps a "famous writer." Anne wants to achieve more than women like her mother or Mrs. van Daan, who are homemakers. Their lives are too narrow for her. She wants be useful or bring enjoyment to people through her writing.

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Anne's plans for the future change during her confinement in the annex as she continues writing in her diary. Her only meaningful companions are Peter and “Kitty,” her diary. She learns how much joy it gives her to write in her diary each day. Simultaneously, she realizes that she has...

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Anne's plans for the future change during her confinement in the annex as she continues writing in her diary. Her only meaningful companions are Peter and “Kitty,” her diary. She learns how much joy it gives her to write in her diary each day. Simultaneously, she realizes that she has a talent for writing. She determines that she would like to be a writer and a journalist. Her diary entry reads:

I finally realized that I must do my schoolwork to keep from being ignorant, to get on in life, to become a journalist, because that's what I want!

Although she questions whether she will be good enough to become a journalist or a writer, saying “it remains to be seen whether I really have talent,” she also believes that she has an intrinsic ability for it. She notes, however, that she is her own harshest critic. She even realizes that Kitty (her diary) has "known for a long time that [her] greatest wish is to be a journalist, and later on, a famous writer" because this has been Anne's aspiration for a while.

Anne also realizes that what she sees of her mother’s life or that of Mrs. van Daan is too narrow for her. She does not want to be a wife and mother exclusively as they are, with no profession outside of caring for her family. She writes that she wants to achieve more than they do and that she cannot imagine having to live like Mother, Mrs. van Daan, and “all the women who go about their work and are then forgotten.”

She wants to have something besides a husband and children to devote herself to, and she also wants to be useful or bring enjoyment to all people through her writing.

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