How has Pip changed during the first stage of Great Expecatations?Note the way he behaves towards his family, what he says to others, what others say to him, what he thinks and how he speaks.  ...

How has Pip changed during the first stage of Great Expecatations?

Note the way he behaves towards his family, what he says to others, what others say to him, what he thinks and how he speaks.

 

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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During the first stage of Great Expectations, Pip learns "the stupendous power of money." Before his experiences at Satis House where he is called "a common laboring boy" who has coarse hands and boots, Pip has had no experience of the distinctions of social class.  About the loving Joe Gargery, whom Pip narrates in Chapter VII that he has had

... a new sensation of feeling conscious that I was looking up to Joe in my heart

Pip later feels ashamed as Joe stands silently dumbfounded in Miss Havisham's presence in Chapter XIII as she glances at Joe "as if she understood what he really was...."  Upon his return, Pip no longer enjoys sitting before the fire with Joe.  Instead he narrates,

It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home....  Within a single year all this was changed. Now, it was all coarse and common, and I would not have had Miss Havisham and Estella see it on any account.

And, in the next chapter, Chapter XIV, Pip remarks on himself,

...I would feel more ashamed of home than ever, in my own ungracious heart.

Pip worries as he works as Joe's apprentice that Estella may one day see him working at the forge 

...with a black face and hands, doing the coarsest part of my work, and would exult over me and depise me.

Influenced by his experiences outside his home, Pip becomes eager to leave after Mr. Jaggers arrives one night to inform him that he has "great expectations."  He is embarrassed to have Joe accompany him to the stage and

wished to walk away all alone.  I am afraid that this purpose originated in my sense of the contrast there would be between me and Joe if we went to the coach together. I had pretended with myself that there was nothing of this taint in the arrangement, but when I went up to my little room on this last night, I felt compelled to admit that it might be so, and had an impulse upon me to go down again and entreat Joe to walk with me in the morning.  I did not.

In the First Stage of Great Expectations, Pip falls from innocence into the corruption of the spirit that the false values of money and social class bring.  As the adult narrator, Pip remarks that he becomes aware of his "ingratitude," especially to "dear Joe" whom he is so eager to leave behind because he is too coarse.  Pip desires to become a gentleman as he falsely perceives that doing so will elevate him and make him a better person. He becomes what he later calls himself, "a self-swindler."

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