A Doll's House Questions and Answers
by Henrik Ibsen

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How has Nora's attitude changed at the end of A Doll's House act 3? What actions and lines of dialogue changed your mind?

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Nora finds her voice. Early in the play, Nora allows Torvald to belittle her with insulting "pet" names and endures his comments like "You're an odd little one." Torvald treats his wife like a child at best (and something less than human at worst), and in the beginning, Nora smiles and plays the part of his "little lark." In act 3, however, Nora realizes the truth about her marriage and delivers this line:

You don't understand me. And I've never understood you either—until tonight. No, don't interrupt. You can just listen to what I say.

The Nora in act 1 simply didn't have this type of courage or confidence in herself. By the end, she can effectively make her husband listen to her.

Nora realizes that she can be more than a man's possession . In act 1, she obtains the money needed for her husband's medical treatment by forging some documents. This actually begins to lay a foundation that she will need for her eventual escape—it gives her the knowledge that she can be resourceful enough to...

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