how has man being the only creature with developed language affected our lives?this is for an essay, and it said to get other people's opinions on the subject.  this is after we read the book...

how has man being the only creature with developed language affected our lives?

this is for an essay, and it said to get other people's opinions on the subject.  this is after we read the book pygmalion.

Asked on by lisakovacs

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accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think one way that we can relate this question to the play Pygmalion is by talking about the way in which we use language as another way of defining ourselves and also as the basis for dividing ourselves into social groupings based on our accent and the kind of diction we use. This of course is not always a positive thing, as the play shows.

kplhardison's profile pic

Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted on

The fact that we are the only creatures with sophisticated, intricately developed language that comes in many variations has affected us by separating us from other creatures on the planet. It is we who raise animals and interpret whether they do or do not communicate with us and each other by directed deliberate language. It is also we who dominate and overturn other creatures' habitats for our own purposes and ambitions.

herappleness's profile pic

M.P. Ossa | College Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

The way in which language has affected our human condition is by allowing us to communicate information from generation to generation. Language allows us to transfer much needed intelligence that may help protect us in many different ways. Much like with the methods of communication of other living beings, having a form of language is the only way to survive as species. In Pygmalion we can see the importance of language for the main character, as well as for society as a whole. Having a specific accent seemed to be a problem for Victorians, and certainly the need of acquiring a posh accent seems to separate the classes. As we can see, language is an element of unification and separation at the same time.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I've had dogs and I've had infants, and I don't think that they have anything that you would really call language...

The fact that we are the only animals to have true language has completely enriched our lives.  Because we have language, we can communicate any idea we wish to one another.  Because we have language, we can have media such as books and music and television by which we can convey ideas and emotions to one another.  Language has made our lives complex in ways that are completely beyond the realm of what other animals can possibly experience.

ms-einstein's profile pic

ms-einstein | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

Posted on

This question presupposes humans are the only creatures with developed language. I suspect they are the last species to develop language. Have you ever listened to the birds as the sun sets? I do not know what they say, but it sounds distinctly like lullabies of love. When I take my dogs out for walks, Brady begins barking the moment we leave the driveway. "Watch out, guys, I'm here. I'm here." That's my interpretation of what he says. The dogs have barks and sounds for stranger approaching, stranger in the house, prey in the yard, it's time to play with each other, and please don't bother me, I'm comfortable. Ask any mother with a baby a few months old and she will tell you the infant has different cries, although she may not always be able to interpret them.

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