How has Katniss rebelled against the Capitol in The Hunger Games and why?

Katniss rebels against the capitol by shooting an arrow into the apple atop their lunch meat, since they were not paying attention to her. She later rebels again, this time inadvertently, by acting as though she and Peeta are going to commit suicide when the announcement is made that they cannot both be victors in the seventy-fourth Hunger Games.

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In the context of the first book, I would argue that there are two instances in which Katniss shows rebellion against the capital. The first is an overt display of rebellion, which oddly enough does not get her into trouble. The second, which was the one that got Katniss into...

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In the context of the first book, I would argue that there are two instances in which Katniss shows rebellion against the capital. The first is an overt display of rebellion, which oddly enough does not get her into trouble. The second, which was the one that got Katniss into real trouble and set the stage for the action of the following two books, was actually unintentional.

The first incident takes place in chapter 7 at the Training Center when Katniss gets fed up with the game makers, who are not paying her any attention during the session in which they were meant to be assessing her. As usual, she shoots perfectly, and the arrow hits the apple atop the meat which was to be the game makers' lunch. It was an act of rebellion designed to get their attention, and it certainly worked, but it did not land Katniss in trouble.

The second incident, on the other hand, was one in which rebellion was the last thing on Katniss's mind. In fact, she didn't even realize that she was rebelling. It takes place right at the end of the games, when the new rule which stated that she and Peeta could both be winners is revoked. Her innocent suggestion to Peeta that they both eat poisonous berries to commit suicide so that neither of them would have to return home without the other is seen by the Capitol as the height of rebellion.

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In The Hunger Games, Katniss rebels against the Capitol by simply refusing to play by their rules in any way that she can. While none of the selected "tributes" seem to have any love for the Capitol, Katniss alone possesses the courage and fearlessness of death to defy them. The first time that Katniss defies the Capitol, she takes revenge on Rue's killer, stays with Rue while she dies, and spreads flowers over her body. This causes Rue's district to send Katniss a loaf of bread as thanks, creating a sense of camaraderie among districts that is contrary to the power structure of the Capitol.

In order to create more tension between districts, the Capitol declares that the two tributes from a district can win as a team, but when Katniss and Peeta win, the Capitol takes it back and declares that the two must fight to the death. In a huge act of defiance, Katniss plans to eat poisoned berries with Peeta and create a no-win situation to protest the games. Too afraid to call the bluff, the Capitol concedes that the two are both victors.

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I am going to assume that this answer needs to be based on events that happen in book one of the trilogy. There is some subjectivity to this answer, so feel free to pick various events and explain why they are rebellious against the Capitol. Katniss's rebellion is shown to readers very early on in the book. Her district is a very poor district and feeding the family the legal way hardly gets the family enough calories to survive. Katniss supplements the family food intake and income by hunting outside the fence. We are told that is illegal. I also see Katniss's volunteering as tribute for the Hunger Games as slightly rebellious. While the rules do allow it, she is somewhat subverting the lottery process. Once at the Capitol, Katniss tries not to draw too much attention to herself, but chapter 7 ends with her shooting an arrow at the Gamemakers. Befriending Rue is also a rebellious act. It is assumed that tributes will work with the other member from their district, but Katniss takes on an ally from another district. Finally, Katniss is able to force the Capitol into allowing two winners to emerge from the Hunger Games.

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In the first book of the Hunger Games trilogy, it was not Katniss' intent to rebel against the Capitol. Neither she nor any of her friends in District 12 had any love for the government. The Capitol had kept very tight control over all the Districts since an uprising in District 13, including forcing all remaining twelve Districts to send two teenagers each to the Hunger Games each year--a fight to the death for all except one champion. Katniss, at 16, was the breadwinner for her mother, her younger sister Prim and herself; her hunting and trading are what fed them. She had no time for active rebellion. When Prim was selected as District 12's female "tribute", Katniss volunteered instead in order to save Prim. Once in the Games, she simply tried to keep herself alive. When the possibility that both Katniss and Peeta could survive when the rules changed, she worked for that. The Capitol again changed the rules once Katniss and Peeta were the two remaining tributes. Katniss' strategy of threatening no winners, by both eating the poison berries, worked--but made enemies of the Capitol. President Snow saw it as a deliberate ploy to disgrace the Capitol and himself, and saw Katniss as a rebel that had to be destroyed.

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