Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell

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How has George Orwell's context shaped the construction of "Shooting an Elephant"?

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George Orwell's context is that of a young man who was raised in English society in the early twentieth century. He was part of the class system in England but lived, nevertheless, in a more equitable society than Burma—England did not have a conquering group of overlords from another country oppressing the native English people.

When Orwell arrived in Burma as a middle-class Englishman, he was shocked and dismayed by the hatred between the British imperialists and the native Burmese. He was not used to being hated and not used to the huge gulf in privilege that separated people like him from the native population.

Orwell's narrator blames the tensions and problems in Burma on imperialism, saying of the imperialist system,

I had already made up my mind that imperialism was an evil thing and the sooner I chucked up my job and got out of it the better.

Because of Orwell's context, in which he knew both British norms at home as well as what imperialism was like abroad, he was well positioned...

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