In "Everyday Use," how has Dee changed since she has last seen her mother and sister?

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When Dee returns, she seems to have developed quite an interest in certain aspects of her heritage. She seems very interested, now, in her racial heritage; she has changed her name to a much more African-sounding one -- Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo -- because she claims that she wants to distance...

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When Dee returns, she seems to have developed quite an interest in certain aspects of her heritage. She seems very interested, now, in her racial heritage; she has changed her name to a much more African-sounding one -- Wangero Leewanika Kemanjo -- because she claims that she wants to distance herself from the whites who have oppressed her. However, her original name, Dee, is actually a family name that has marked a long history of strong women. This point is lost on Dee.

Further, she does suddenly take an interest in the house and various items that Mama and Maggie use on a daily basis: their benches, the butter churn top and dasher, the quilts, and so forth. However, she has no real interest in learning the stories behind the family members who made them, and she does not really care that her mother and sister use these items. Instead, she wants to take them home so that she can do "something artistic" with them; she plans to hang the quilts on the wall to preserve them, and she is horrified by the thought that her sister would actually use them. She seems interested in the trappings of heritage, more than she ever has been before, but not the actual heritage itself. She wants to preserve the items without realizing that the items are of less value than the stories and the memories that she lacks.

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In "Everyday Use," Dee returns to the Johnsons' home much changed.  When Dee pulls up in the car with her friend, Mrs. Johnson and Maggie say that they can hardly recognize her.  Dee is wearing a colorful dress that is quite out of place in the dusty area where they live.  In addition to her physical change, Dee appears to have a different mentality as well.  When Dee left for college, she could not wait to get away from her family as if she had been embarrassed by their lifestyle.  However, now Dee is very interested in her family's heritage, and she asks her mother about all the items in the house that have been made by their ancestors.  Mrs. Johnson is surprised by Dee's sudden interest in the items in the house, and she is even more taken aback when Dee asks for the quilts--on a former occasion, Dee snubbed her mother's offer to take the quilts.  So Dee upon returning to the family's home has arrived with not only a different physical appearance, but with a different mentality as well.

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