How has the ability of African-Americans to verbalize and transfer their struggles through music into the public spectrum affected other minority races?From living as objects of forced slavery and...

How has the ability of African-Americans to verbalize and transfer their struggles through music into the public spectrum affected other minority races?

From living as objects of forced slavery and even beyond the abolishment of slavery, many Blacks have expressed the importance of resonating their ancestors' anguish and their present pain through music. Many other minority races have endured similar experiences of racial injustice, but have yet to express their personal pains as collectively as the African-American community.

Asked on by magnotta

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literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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The impact which African-Americans have had on the American culture have been established for more than a few decades. That said, they have had time to become accepted (for lack of a better word) as a part of the American culture. Other minority groups' music, on the other hand, tends to still not be recognized as "mainstream."

Given that the music of other minority groups fails to be seen as mainstream (with the exception of a few breakout hits/stars), the struggles and messages are left unheard by the majority of Americans.

Another fact that may have been neglected is the recognition by Americans that other minority groups have been treated as badly as African-Americans (oppressed, enslaved, etc.). Without this recognition, many Americans many not be familiar with the trials other minority groups have faced. This said, their message will not (and has not) had the opportunity to influence American culture in the same way that African-American music (and other arts) have.

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