How does Harper Lee depict those who are isolated in To Kill a Mockingbird?

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee likens many of the isolated to mockingbirds. When Scout and Jem first start learning how to shoot with their air rifles, Atticus tells them the following:

I'd rather you shot at tin cans in the back yard, but I know you'll...

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In To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee likens many of the isolated to mockingbirds. When Scout and Jem first start learning how to shoot with their air rifles, Atticus tells them the following:

I'd rather you shot at tin cans in the back yard, but I know you'll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird. (Ch. 10)

The reason why is because mockingbirds aren't nuisances in the way many other birds are; all mockingbirds do is sing for us all day long. In other words, all Mockingbirds do all day long is show kindness. Many of the isolated in Lee's story behave as mockingbirds do.

The "isolated" in Lee's story is any person who is different from others, either in terms of behavior, race, or religion. One of the isolated members of society is Arthur Radley. The neighborhood kids mockingly call him Boo Radley and treat him like a dangerous and frightening person just because he never leaves his house. In mocking Arthur Radley, the society isolates him. Regardless of how he is treated, Arthur behaves like a mockingbird by making an effort to reach out to the children in his own quiet way through leaving them gifts in a knothole in an oak tree on his property and by mending Jem's pants. Arthur behaves like a mockingbird in one final way in the story by saving Scout's and Jem's lives.

Tom Robinson is a second isolated mockingbird in the story. We learn early in the story from Calpurnia that the Robinsons are good Church-going folks. We also learn from Robinson's testimony at his trial that Robinson often did favors for Mayella Ewell, such as chopping up a chiffarobe to use as kindling, for free simply because he knew nobody else was helping her and felt sorry for her. In showing kindness to Mayella, Robinson acts as an innocent mockingbird. Yet, he is isolated by society when he is accused of a crime he didn't commit and later even shot to death though innocent.

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