How good of an ironic sense of humor does the creature have in the novel Frankenstein?

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The irony lays primarily in the way that a man as intelligent and gifted as Victor is able to actually create life, while hindering his own sense of dignity, intellect, and humanity. He, Victor, became the "wretch", as he said in his own words to Walton.

Contrastingly, the creature ...

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The irony lays primarily in the way that a man as intelligent and gifted as Victor is able to actually create life, while hindering his own sense of dignity, intellect, and humanity. He, Victor, became the "wretch", as he said in his own words to Walton.

Contrastingly, the creature was SUPPOSED to be the wretch: Made up like jigsaw puzzle of rotten flesh taken from dead bodies, and with no purpose to its creation but merely to be created, it actually developed an intellect, sentimentality, and depth of emotion that is kind of ironically comical, especially when you read how the creature was identifying with Milton's Paradise Lost. When you put these facts into perspective, it sure brings an ironic sense of humor to the story.

 

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