How to get kids to read a bookI am looking for strategies on how to get kids to read a book from grades Kindergarten to grade 2... I have a couple but need some good creative ones, my mind is...

How to get kids to read a book

I am looking for strategies on how to get kids to read a book from grades Kindergarten to grade 2... I have a couple but need some good creative ones, my mind is tapped.

Here are my two right now...just wondering if anyone has any other creative suggestions on how to a student to READ the book?

Strategies

1.      Making a Connection:  Using real life experiences and compare them to the book.  Have the student read the book to see if the story has ever happened to them in their life.  

2.      Puppet show:  Once the student has read the book, have them act out the story with puppets and act out their favorite lines from the book.

Any help is greatly appreciated... the crazy/whackier the better :)

 

Asked on by wantubeprg

6 Answers | Add Yours

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Children that age also like to play teacher. Something you might let them do that would encourage the reading of books is to allow them to teach the book to the class. You might let them choose a book, and then talk to them before they read it and explain they are going to play teacher. Let them teach the class about words they learned, things they learned about the characters, and etc.

brettd's profile pic

brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Provide a wide range of reading for them to choose from, and allow them to pick the things they like and enjoy.  Build the love of reading first, along with the basic skills of vocabulary and pronunciation, then expand into more structured, directed reading activities.

It's my theory that, if a kid views reading as an unpleasant chore when they are young, then they will avoid it whenever possible later in life.  At least, that's what I see with the seniors I teach.

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Children love to pretend to be someone, so often they like to re-enact scenes from their readings; especially is someone can pretend to be an animal or get to dress up.  If possible, "staging" scenes from the book, and allowing minor changes in the "scripts" may encourage creative little minds.

auntlori's profile pic

Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Any time you can connect reading to real-life learning or experience, you've got a winner.  So, before a field trip to the zoo, they should be reading about the animals they'll be seeing.  When they're preparing for a Thanksgiving unit, they should be reading about those historical figures and places as well as any other traditions.  Christmas has all kinds of possibilities for traveling the world to examine the traditions of this holiday. 

How about having them become the "teacher" to share what they've been reading with the rest of your class.  Making a collage (simplistic but fun) with representative pictures and things from the book is also fun.  If you have any kind of a prop box (with costume items such as hats and accessories and whatever else seems fun) they can re-enact or even add a new ending to the story.  Even having a parent day when kids present something to parents (or groups of them divided throughout the year) would be a good incentive for young readers, as well.

I teach high school, so I'm sure elementary teachers would have more creative ideas; however, what's true in these early grades is also true in high school.  Give them a reason to read and they'll read.

sophia3586's profile pic

sophia3586 | Elementary School Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

How to get kids to read a book

I am looking for strategies on how to get kids to read a book from grades Kindergarten to grade 2... I have a couple but need some good creative ones, my mind is tapped.

Here are my two right now...just wondering if anyone has any other creative suggestions on how to a student to READ the book?

Strategies

1.      Making a Connection:  Using real life experiences and compare them to the book.  Have the student read the book to see if the story has ever happened to them in their life.  

2.      Puppet show:  Once the student has read the book, have them act out the story with puppets and act out their favorite lines from the book.

Any help is greatly appreciated... the crazy/whackier the better :)

 

All these suggestions are great! Just to add a bit...I find that reading aloud can be powerful. It makes reading become exciting...as exciting as a movie. Reading aloud a variety of books and showing your excitement towards them may help gear students in the right direction.

wantubeprg's profile pic

wantubeprg | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Any time you can connect reading to real-life learning or experience, you've got a winner.  So, before a field trip to the zoo, they should be reading about the animals they'll be seeing.  When they're preparing for a Thanksgiving unit, they should be reading about those historical figures and places as well as any other traditions.  Christmas has all kinds of possibilities for traveling the world to examine the traditions of this holiday. 

How about having them become the "teacher" to share what they've been reading with the rest of your class.  Making a collage (simplistic but fun) with representative pictures and things from the book is also fun.  If you have any kind of a prop box (with costume items such as hats and accessories and whatever else seems fun) they can re-enact or even add a new ending to the story.  Even having a parent day when kids present something to parents (or groups of them divided throughout the year) would be a good incentive for young readers, as well.

I teach high school, so I'm sure elementary teachers would have more creative ideas; however, what's true in these early grades is also true in high school.  Give them a reason to read and they'll read.

  Thanks so much! Great help! :)

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