How are George and Lydia shown to have failed their children in "The Veldt" by Ray Bradbury?

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Gretchen Mussey eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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Despite their good intentions, George and Lydia Hadley's decision to purchase a Happylife Home to automate their life negatively affects their children's psyche, as they allow Wendy and Peter to completely control their home. Both Wendy and Peter become obsessed with their interactive nursery, which displays images of their thoughts. Lately, Wendy and Peter have been conjuring the environment of the African veldt, which reveals their increasingly violent and hostile thoughts toward their parents. As the children become more and more obsessed with their nursery, their attitudes become more threatening toward George and Lydia, who allow their children to talk back and blatantly disobey them. A psychologist even tells George and Lydia that the veldt is a reflection of their children's resentment and anger, which prompts George to lock the nursery.

Essentially, George and Lydia have failed their children by allowing technology to replace them as parents. They have unknowingly allowed...

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