How does Gatsby's obsession with Daisy impact the other characters?

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Gatsby's obsession with Daisy not only drives the plot but also impacts each of the main characters in the story. Both Nick and Jordan Baker act as intermediaries between Gatsby and Daisy in order to reunite the former couple. Jordan asks Nick to invite Daisy over for tea, where...

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Gatsby's obsession with Daisy not only drives the plot but also impacts each of the main characters in the story. Both Nick and Jordan Baker act as intermediaries between Gatsby and Daisy in order to reunite the former couple. Jordan asks Nick to invite Daisy over for tea, where she reunites with Gatsby. Since Nick is Gatsby's neighbor and Daisy's relative, he becomes involved in their relationship and develops a close friendship with Gatsby. Gatsby's obsession with Daisy also impacts her marriage with Tom, as she proceeds to engage in an affair with him. Once Tom discovers his wife's infidelity, he exposes Gatsby on a hot summer day in the city in front of Jordan, Daisy, and Nick. Gatsby then allows Daisy to drive his car home, and she ends up hitting and killing Myrtle Wilson on the way. George Wilson, Myrtle's husband, is devastated by her death and seeks revenge. After Tom informs George that Gatsby was responsible for Myrtle's death, he travels to Gatsby's home, where he murders Gatsby before committing suicide. Overall, Gatsby's obsession with Daisy is the catalyst for his interactions with Nick, Jordan, Tom, George, and Myrtle.

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Gatsby's obsession with Daisy affects Nick, certainly. He asks Jordan to ask Nick if Nick will invite Daisy over for tea, alone, so that Gatsby can "accidentally" knock on his door and show up, reuniting with Daisy. It's a pretty childish maneuver, like something someone would do when they are thirteen. Then, later, Nick has to pretend, especially to Tom, Daisy's husband, that there is nothing untoward going on between Gatsby and Daisy. Nick even has to cover for them during Gatsby's party when they go to his house to be together in private. It's a similar story with Jordan Baker, Daisy's best friend; she has to look the other way, pretending she doesn't see their illicit behavior. One could even say that Gatsby's obsession with Daisy helps to lead to the deaths of Myrtle Wilson, George Wilson, and Gatsby himself. If Gatsby weren't so obsessed with being with Daisy, then he wouldn't be with her in New York that day, wouldn't have the terrible fight with Tom, wouldn't let her drive home, and they wouldn't hit Myrtle with the car.

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