How is the fur personified in the beginning and ending of the story "Miss Brill"? How does the personification help emphasize Miss Brill's character?

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When the story begins, Miss Brill is quite excited to get started with her Sunday routine. She will go to the jardins publiques, or the public park, and she will spend the afternoon looking at people.

As she gets ready to go to the park, she takes out her fur....

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When the story begins, Miss Brill is quite excited to get started with her Sunday routine. She will go to the jardins publiques, or the public park, and she will spend the afternoon looking at people.

As she gets ready to go to the park, she takes out her fur. Here, the narrative is told from Miss Brill's point of view, focusing on her feelings toward it. The fur is actually a necklet. However, Miss Brill talks to it, and thinks about it, as if it were her pet, and not a piece of clothing.

Miss Brill put up her hand and touched her fur. Dear little thing! It was nice to feel it again. [...] Oh, how sweet it was to see them snap at her again from the red eiderdown! [...] Little rogue! Yes, she really felt like that about it. ...She could have taken it off and laid it on her lap and stroked it.

These details offer insight on the degree of loneliness in Miss Brill's life. That she has given the traits of a living being to an inanimate object may not be so uncommon; children do it with dolls, and adults do it with cherished collectibles that may resemble something living. Miss Brill's fur was in the likeness of a fox. Therefore, we can bypass her fixation. However, her behavior shows that she has developed feelings toward this inanimate object. This is the fact that makes the situation all the more strange. 

Once in the park, she will make up stories in her mind about who each park visitor is, and why they are there. She will feel as if she were part of a stage, and the people around her are the actors. Moreover, she will do all this with a smile on her face, reflective of her emotions. In fact, her emotions take over at one point when Miss Brill feels overwhelmed with excitability at the notion of being part of the same scenario as the other park visitors; of sharing a space with them. She even cries!

In the middle of all this, she gets carried away, not realizing that a couple of young lovers are laughing at her. When she finally notices, and hears them call her fur "fried fish", she leaves the part and goes straight to her small apartment.

There, she puts the fox necklet back in its box, and she feels "something" crying. The crying was her own...or was it she imagining her fox crying? Either way, it is yet another dimension of Miss Brill's extreme loneliness and of the way that she attempts to manage to live life every day. 

The box that the fur came out of was on the bed. She unclasped the necklet quickly; quickly, without looking, laid it inside. But when she put the lid on she thought she heard something crying.

The personification not only sets forth the fact that Miss Brill has reached new lows in terms of how lonely she feels, but also that she is desperately trying to connect to "something". She is unsuccessful at her attempt, and all that she can do is remain and continue with her life, as she knows it. 

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