How does Fred think about his uncle?

2 Answers

stolperia's profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Ebenezer Scrooge's nephew Fred feels sorry for Scrooge. He invites Scrooge to come around to his home for his Christmas gathering as a "homage to Christmas" but Scrooge resolutely refuses.

Describing the exchange at the party, Fred explains to his wife and their guests,

He's a comical old fellow...and not so pleasant as he might be. However, his offences carry their own punishment...I am sorry for him; I couldn't be angry with him if I tried.

Later, Fred uses Uncle Scrooge as his mystery object when playing "Yes and No." Once the identity of the unknown item has been discovered, some of the guests argue that Scrooge should have been positively identified as being a bear since he had been described as being rather disagreeable, savage, and one that growls and grunts at times.

After Scrooge's change of heart, however, Fred is thrilled when Scrooge joins the Christmas gathering and welcomes him back into the family wholeheartedly.

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jameadows's profile pic

jameadows | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Fred, Scrooge's nephew, is a kind character who only feels pity for Scrooge. He says, "I couldn't be angry with him if I tried." He feels that Scrooge doesn't hurt anyone with his miserly and isolated behavior but himself. He knows that Scrooge has nowhere else to go, save his old chambers or his dusty office, and that Fred extends Scrooge his only invitation for Christmas.

Fred intends to continue inviting Scrooge to his Christmas party because, though Scrooge may "rail at Christmas till he dies," Fred believes that his extending an invitation to Scrooge each year challenges his uncle's thinking. Fred says that even if his invitation makes Scrooge leave his clerk a few pounds, that he has accomplished something with his uncle. Fred says that he believes he "shook him yesterday," and the reality is that Scrooge is undergoing a change as Fred speaks by going about with the Ghosts of Christmases Past, Present, and Future. Scrooge accepts Fred's invitation at the end of the story, and Fred welcomes him graciously into his house.  

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