How far do you think that Steinbeck presents dreams as futile in "Of Mice and Men?"If you could please write the answer in essay form? I've allready written an essay on it I just need to compare...

How far do you think that Steinbeck presents dreams as futile in "Of Mice and Men?"

If you could please write the answer in essay form? I've allready written an essay on it I just need to compare mine to pick up some quotes, see where I could have included extra information, so on... ALL HELP IS GREATLY APPRECIATED thaankyou sooooo muchh

1 Answer | Add Yours

ajmchugh's profile pic

ajmchugh | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

Posted on

Glad you've already written an essay!  Seems you have a good start.  I obviously won't write an essay for you, but I'll give you some points to consider. 

Steinbeck's title is borrowed from a line in Robert Burns' "To A Mouse," a poem whose speaker has just overturned a mouse's nest with his plow.  As the speaker observes how quickly he has just ruined the mouse's hard work, he notes that the best-laid plans of mice and men often go awry (translation).  Steinbeck obviously uses this idea to shape the characters and plot in his novel. 

The most obvious example that supports the idea that dreams can be futile is the dream George and Lennie have to own the farm.  It's clear from the beginning of the novel that Lennie can't really function in society, and the story George tells Slim (about the incident in Weed) forshadows Lennie's killing of Curley's wife in Chapter 5. 

Further, readers understand that because Curley's wife's dreams of becoming an actress never materialized, she is a lonely woman who is resentful of her role as an emotionally-starved wife.  Because she married Curley, she is unable to have a meaningful relationship with anyone and feels that she never achieved her true potential.

You might also look at Crooks, since the fact that he is black keeps him from interacting freely with the other ranch hands and living the kind of life he wants to live.  Similarly, Candy voices a concern that because he is old and can't use his hand, he won't have a place on the ranch for much longer.  Both of these characters (Candy moreso) express interest in leaving the ranch to go with George and Lennie to the farm. 

We’ve answered 318,913 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question