How would you explain Faber's speech in Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 in which he argues that there are three missing things in books?

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Montag has advanced in his understanding of the content in books, but he has no context for putting together the totality of a fully literate life. Faber helps him understand how to evaluate content as well as contextualize his bookish existence.

The information inside every book is not equal in...

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Montag has advanced in his understanding of the content in books, but he has no context for putting together the totality of a fully literate life. Faber helps him understand how to evaluate content as well as contextualize his bookish existence.

The information inside every book is not equal in substance. Each reader has to learn how to evaluate the quality or substance of the material the author presents. Faber stresses social norms; he seems to endorse classics or a canon.

Faber also speaks of leisure as important. It seems like Montag's society has plenty of free time, but social organization actually thwarts their ability to digest or consider content on a deep level. Montag is aware of this in general at home with the distracting TV walls, but it really sinks in on the train when the ad jingles interfere with his thinking.

Faber also instills in Montag the importance of free access to information in governing civil society. Reading and reflecting are not enough: action is required, and for that people need rights. Specifically,

the right to carry out actions based on what we learn

in combining the first two factors.

While Faber doubts, because he has turned "sour" or cynical, that the two of them are the right people to act in support of these missing characteristics, Montag does embark on that mission.

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In this speech, Faber does not argue that there are three things missing from books. In fact, he argues that books are superior to other forms of entertainment, like television, because they possess the three following things:

  • Firstly, there is the "quality of information." By this, Faber means that books contain messages which show all aspects of life. Unlike the television shows that characters like Mildred watch, books focus on an array of subject and issues, from the happy to the sad and the reflective, which make people think, instead of being passive observers.
  • Secondly, there is the "leisure to digest it." Here, Faber means that books can be closed at any time by the reader. The reader can also choose the subject and choose whether or not to accept the book's message. In short, "books can be beaten down." But this is not possible with other forms of entertainment. Viewers have no control over the programmes on the television, for example, and it's very difficult to shout over the characters or the background music.
  • Finally, there is "the right to carry out actions based on what we learn" from these first two points. This relates specifically to Faber and Montag's society, a society which censors people and discourages thought and reflection. It focuses instead on the instant gratification from fast forms of entertainment, like watching television and racing cars, which do not require a person to engage his mind. For Faber, this is a major problem and one which pushes him to rebellion. 
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