How exactly did the New Deal change the American government?  

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The effects of the New Deal are still contested--many conservatives in particular view its effects as disastrous--but it is beyond dispute that it changed the size and scope of the federal government. The New Deal was an institutional response to the problems of the Great Depression. Under FDR's leadership, Congress...

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The effects of the New Deal are still contested--many conservatives in particular view its effects as disastrous--but it is beyond dispute that it changed the size and scope of the federal government. The New Deal was an institutional response to the problems of the Great Depression. Under FDR's leadership, Congress passed dozens of laws establishing programs aimed at relief, recovery and reform. Many of these programs, like the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and the Works Progress Administration (WPA) involved direct government action to create work for Americans who had lost their jobs amid the economic collapse of the early 1930s. Others, like the Social Security Administration, the Securities Exchange Commission (SEC), and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) were intended to provide structural reform to avoid or at least manage the American economy in such a way as to avoid future economic collapses. As historian David Kennedy has written in his book Freedom From Fear, the New Deal did not really redistribute income or establish anything like state socialism in the United States. But it did "mend the evils of the Depression by reasoned experiment within the existing social system" and promote reforms that are with us today (380). This process involved an enormous expansion of the federal government that exists today.

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