How does Emily Dickinson treat death in her poem "Because I could not stop for Death"?

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In the poem "Because I could not stop for Death," Dickinson treats death as a person.  Giving human traits and qualities to nonhuman things and ideas is a common literary technique.  It is called personification, and it is a main literary technique used in this poem. 

In reality, death...

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In the poem "Because I could not stop for Death," Dickinson treats death as a person.  Giving human traits and qualities to nonhuman things and ideas is a common literary technique.  It is called personification, and it is a main literary technique used in this poem. 

In reality, death marks the end of a biological life.  It is a moment.  It does not have a personality, but Dickinson changes that in this poem.  She turns death into a person.  Treating death as a person is not a new idea. However, Dickinson definitely bucks the traditional personification of death.  Most readers might think of Death as an old guy dressed in all black who carries a scythe, but Dickinson portrays Death as a kindly gentleman.  He pulls his carriage up to her and kindly picks her up.  The two of them then casually and calmly ride through the town's streets.  The poem creates a beautiful image of Death and makes the carriage ride seem similar to a date between two lovers.  

We slowly drove—He knew no haste 
And I had put away 
My labor and my leisure too, 
For His Civility— 
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