Great Depression

Start Free Trial

How effective was Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal in alleviating the effects of the Great Depression?

FDR's New Deal was somewhat effective in alleviating the effects of the Great Depression. It helped inspire confidence in the American people that the government was working to rectify the situation. New Deal programs provided temporary assistance and jobs to unemployed citizens. However, the event that made the country truly return from its depression was WWII.

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

FDR's New Deal was his ambitious plan to combat the Depression. It included relief for farmers and the unemployed. It buttressed the country's imperiled banking system. FDR created Social Security—perhaps the most enduring legacy of his New Deal program.

Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal was partially successful in alleviating the...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

FDR's New Deal was his ambitious plan to combat the Depression. It included relief for farmers and the unemployed. It buttressed the country's imperiled banking system. FDR created Social Security—perhaps the most enduring legacy of his New Deal program.

Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal was partially successful in alleviating the effects of the Great Depression. Great presidents are successful in times of crisis, including economic crises. For instance, President Abraham Lincoln navigated the country through the Civil War—the greatest crisis in the history of the United States. In 2020, the coronavirus and stock market collapse presented a major challenge to Donald Trump's presidency. FDR faced two crises: the Great Depression and World War II. Interestingly, FDR's second crisis, WWII, helped the nation get through the Great Depression by stimulating economic production.

America has endured periodic recessions since its inception. For example, there were major recessions in 1873 and 1893. However, the federal government did not work to help the public during those crises. Laissez-faire capitalism meant that the government should avoid interfering, as much as possible, in the nation's economy. The economic collapse of 1929 was by far the most serious, though. By the time FDR took office in 1933, a feeling of hopelessness gripped the nation. FDR's radio talks, the fireside chats, reassured an anxious and desperate public.

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team