How does the World State's motto fit the society described in chapter 1 of Brave New World?

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The World State’s motto is clearly displayed over the Hatchery and Condition Centre, which Huxley uses as the model for social structure of the world of this dystopian future: community, identity, stability. All of these things are not organic; through Bokanovsky’s Process of fertilizing and producing manipulated identical embryos on...

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The World State’s motto is clearly displayed over the Hatchery and Condition Centre, which Huxley uses as the model for social structure of the world of this dystopian future: community, identity, stability. All of these things are not organic; through Bokanovsky’s Process of fertilizing and producing manipulated identical embryos on a large scale, they are provided by the state. This process is a fictional one, and likely named to sound Russian, as Huxley was referencing the strict state control of the most famous Communist-leaning nation of his day.

COMMUNITY: Bokanovsky’s Process produces entire classes of people in one “generation”—up to 96 from one embryo—with varying abilities and intelligence. These individuals will grow up together, learn together, receive the same punishments, and eventually perform the same jobs. Their sense of community is already built into their genes.

IDENTITY: In the same way, these professions and limitations provide the individual with his/her identity. They are known by their group, whether they are a(n) Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, or Epsilon. Their names and individuality are hardly relevant, as most individuals are recognized first by their class.

STABILITY: With such strict government control on the birth and development of each individual, there is little doubt as to what any individual should or could be capable of. As the Director explains,

Ninety-six identical twins working ninety-six identical machines!... You really know where you are. For the first time in history.

With everything provided by the state, there are no needs to be met and no discontent among the population. This leads to a stable, highly controlled society.

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The motto of the World State is "Community, Identity, Stability." 

The society described in Chapter One is a very carefully engineered and planned one.  In this way, a community has been developed to be both stable and to reinforce group identity.  The five main groups of people, Alphas, Betas, Gammas, Deltas and Epsilons are carefully socialized to identify with each other and to not want to  belong to another group. They are trained from early childhood to reject the other groups and to find good only in things which are available to them.  This leads inevitably to stability. 

Every group has its own set of jobs and rules, and all members learn to find happiness within the group they have been born to.  The idea of keeping people happy to keep them controlled leads also to stability.  Later in the book, this idea of absence of pain and sorrow is questioned by the outsider John.  But everything in Chapter One is set up to adhere to the motto. 

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