How does the "vascular tissue" in a gymnosperm adopt for survival in a land environment? example: Thin needle like leaves- Adaptation  to the harshness of hot, dry summer, cold winter and moderate rainfall.

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The vascular tissue in a gymnosperm is like a series of tubes, or pipes, running through the stem system of the gymnosperm.  These tubes are responsible for the conduction of water and nutrients from the soil up to the leaves or needles of the gymnosperm.  The plant needs water and...

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The vascular tissue in a gymnosperm is like a series of tubes, or pipes, running through the stem system of the gymnosperm.  These tubes are responsible for the conduction of water and nutrients from the soil up to the leaves or needles of the gymnosperm.  The plant needs water and nutrients to conduct the process of photosynthesis, which is how the plant manufactures its own food.  Light from the sun, combined with carbon dioxide and water will produce glucose and oxygen, the oxygen being discarded as a waste product.  The tubes responsible for the conduction of water and nutrients are called the xylem and the phloem.  There are additional vascular tissues within the stem of the gymnosperm as well.  There are the vascular cambium and the cork cambium, which serve the same capacity to nourish the bark and the underlying layers of bark on the plant.  Together, all the vascular tissues comprise what is known as the vascular tissue system of the plant.

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