How does Thomas Hardy create feelings of sadness in "The Darkling Thrush"?

Hardy creates feelings of sadness in "The Darkling Thrush" by describing the landscape as bleak and desolate, emphasizing the silence with an image of broken lyres, and personifying the century that has passed as a corpse, for whom nature is lamenting.

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In the poem "The Darkling Thrush" by Thomas Hardy, the poet creates feelings of sadness in several ways, including the season, the time of day, the weather, the setting, the imagery, specific word choices, and the implication of the last lines of the poem.

Hardy sets his poem in winter, which is a time of cold and darkness. It is near sunset, as Hardy implies by referring to the sun as "the weakening eye of day." There is frost on the ground, and a "cloudy canopy" covers the sky. The poet leans on a gate with tangled tree stems overhead. All of these details evoke a dismal, colorless, oppressive, and sad background to the poet's musings.

The poet further creates an atmosphere of sadness with the imagery he uses. The stems of the trees are "like strings of broken lyres." Lyres with broken strings can no longer make music, which is an occasion for sadness. People nearby do not just live there but rather "haunt" the landscape, suggesting gloom and melancholy. Hardy wrote this poem at the end of...

(The entire section contains 4 answers and 1090 words.)

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