How does Thomas Gray glorify common men in his elegy?

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In the famous poem "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard," Thomas Gray glorifies common men by making them equal to men who once had possession of power and heraldry. Gray points out that in death, there is no difference between the poor and the wealthy.

Gray describes the...

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In the famous poem "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard," Thomas Gray glorifies common men by making them equal to men who once had possession of power and heraldry. Gray points out that in death, there is no difference between the poor and the wealthy.

Gray describes the "useful toil" of common people such as harvesting, driving their teams of farm animals, plowing fields, and chopping trees in a positive way. He also highlights their "homely joys" of warm fires, housewife's care, and loving children. He cautions that "grandeur"—in other words, the rich—should not distain the simplicity of the poor.

On the other hand, Gray emphasizes that the seeming advantages of heraldry, power, beauty, and wealth that the rich seem to have are all lost at death, saying, "The paths of glory lead but to the grave."

In conclusion, Gray glorifies common men by comparing their lives with the lives of the rich and privileged. His conclusion is that the poor live simple, honest, and honorable lives, while the lives of the rich and privileged are deceitful and hypocritical because ultimately, they will lose all that they possessed that they thought set them apart and made them better.

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