How does "This Side of Paradise" approach and dissect the idea of the American Dream, both in general and specifically for the other characters?

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In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, the character of Amory Blaine expresses the uneasiness that many young Americans experienced after World War I. Amory tells Ferrnby, “I’m a product of a versatile mind in a restless generation.” The idea that the whole generation could be “restless” is central in This...

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In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel, the character of Amory Blaine expresses the uneasiness that many young Americans experienced after World War I. Amory tells Ferrnby, “I’m a product of a versatile mind in a restless generation.” The idea that the whole generation could be “restless” is central in This Side of Paradise. Amory, the protagonist, searches for an authentic identity—but believes he might find it in Europe rather than in the United States.

Other characters also exemplify the conflicts of American individualism that glorify the quest for material well-being over deeper spiritual concerns. Amory tries to break free of the traditional values of his parents’s generation, which he holds responsible for the challenges the young now face. This idea of self-invention and rebellion is also central in the American dream. Rosalind, in chooses a wealthier suitor over Amory, exemplifies the class consciousness that Americans possess but try to pretend they disregard.

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