How does the relationship between Juliet and her nurse change?

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Initially, Juliet and the Nurse have a very good relationship. The Nurse is one of the few adult authority figures whom Juliet feels she can trust. In fact, the Nurse is more of a big sister than anything, which means that Juliet can confide in her in a way that...

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Initially, Juliet and the Nurse have a very good relationship. The Nurse is one of the few adult authority figures whom Juliet feels she can trust. In fact, the Nurse is more of a big sister than anything, which means that Juliet can confide in her in a way that would be unthinkable with her own mother.

But as the play progresses and Juliet's love for Romeo deepens, changes in the relationship begin to manifest themselves. After her parents order her to marry Paris, Juliet is in desperate need of moral support, the kind that the Nurse could always be relied on to provide. Yet when Juliet needs her most, the Nurse betrays her by urging her to forget all about Romeo—who's as good as dead, she claims—and do as her parents tell her to do and marry Paris.

The Nurse's betrayal is all the more astonishing given how she, along with Friar Laurence, helped the two lovebirds get together. Far from trying to dissuade Juliet from seeing Romeo, the Nurse actively encouraged their relationship. But now, in the wake of Romeo's banishment, her attitude has gone full-circle. Now she flatly tells Juliet that Romeo is a "dishclout" by comparison with Paris and that she should marry this "lovely gentleman" instead.

It seems to be the case that the Nurse always regarded Juliet's love for Romeo as nothing more than a girlish infatuation. But now that Romeo's been banished from the city and Juliet's parents are insisting that she get married to Paris, the Nurse thinks it's time for her to get serious, so she encourages Juliet to forget all about Romeo.

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