How does the poet end each of the final stanzas of parts 1, 2, and 3?

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In the first stanza, the speaker personifies the west wind as the "breath of Autumn's being," and then proceeds to describe the power of the wind to scatter the autumn leaves. At the end of the stanza, the speaker addresses the west wind directly, as "Wild Spirit ... Destroyer and...

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In the first stanza, the speaker personifies the west wind as the "breath of Autumn's being," and then proceeds to describe the power of the wind to scatter the autumn leaves. At the end of the stanza, the speaker addresses the west wind directly, as "Wild Spirit ... Destroyer and preserver." The way in which the speaker addresses the wind suggests that, from his perspective, the wind is omnipotent and awe-inspiring, like a god. In the final words of the stanza, the speaker implores the wind to "hear, oh hear!" This suggests that the speaker wants to ask something of the wind. The exclamation mark at the end implies that the speaker is desperate to be heard.

In the second stanza, the speaker continues to eulogize about the power of the wind. He says that the wind has the power to scatter "Loose clouds," and to precipitate "rain and lightning." Later in the stanza, the speaker also describes the wind as a "dirge / Of the dying year," meaning that the sound of the wind seems like a lament for the year that is about to end. At the end of the stanza, the speaker again emphasizes the wind's power when he says that it has the power to cause storms and bring "Black rain, and fire, and hail." The imagery here is rather apocalyptic, emphasizing the power of the wind. As at the end of the first stanza, the speaker also, at the end of the second, addresses the wind directly and implores it to "hear!"

The third stanza follows much the same pattern as the first and second stanzas. The speaker pays homage to the power of the west wind, which, he says, "waken(s) from his summer dreams / The blue Mediterranean." At the end of the stanza, the speaker says that the west wind's voice makes the "sapless foliage of the ocean ... grow gray with fear, / And tremble and despoil themselves." This description represents a climactic escalation of the wind's power through the first three stanzas of the poem. Finally, at the very end of the stanza, the speaker once again implores the wind to, "oh hear!"

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