How does the narrator try to establish his sanity, and where is the narrator's sanity called into question in "The Tell-Tale Heart"? I am looking for quotes from the story "The Tell-Tale Heart."

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The narrator of Edgar Allan Poe's story opens the tale by insisting that he is not only sane, but also stronger because of a recent illness that has rendered his "mind ... feelings ... senses stronger, more powerful." In particular, he claims that his "sense of hearing especially became more powerful." A thoughtful reader will understand right away that the narrator's protestations of his sanity are a red flag that something is wrong with his thought process. Generally speaking, people who are well-adjusted and healthy don't need to verbally affirm their mental fitness. The narrator, however, assures his audience that he will, in fact, prove "how healthy [his] mind is."

Readers' suspicion that the narrator is indeed insane is confirmed when he explains that because he found the old man's eye disturbing and vulture-like, he knew he had to kill him. He tries to rationalize his irrational act and, in doing so, offers irrefutable proof of his derangement. He employs a logical fallacy by...

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