How does the health care system in the United States compare to that in other industrial countries? If you think health care is a human right? Why or why not? How can equality and inequality in health care impact society?

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Even though the United States spends more money on health care than most industrial countries, it still has one of the most unequal health care systems. Most industrialized countries provide universal healthcare coverage that ensures almost equal access to healthcare for all citizens. In contrast, the United States does not...

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Even though the United States spends more money on health care than most industrial countries, it still has one of the most unequal health care systems. Most industrialized countries provide universal healthcare coverage that ensures almost equal access to healthcare for all citizens. In contrast, the United States does not have a single nationwide system and instead has a combination of public and private health coverage. This means that people's health insurance tends to be linked to their employment status and therefore their financial status. According to the Washington Post, before the COVID-19 pandemic in late 2019 eleven percent of the population in the United States lacked health insurance altogether.

One could argue that health care is a basic human right because all people deserve to live in a state that provides them access to care and keeps them safe. The United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights includes the right to health in Article 25. The right to health is also important because inequality in health care can have a profound impact on society. For instance, in the United States, unequal access to health care reinforces the growing wealth gap. Since access to quality health insurance typically requires a secure full-time job with benefits, many low-income Americans and immigrants do not have it. Without insurance, they cannot afford to get treatment for health problems without going into debt, which reduces their quality of life and makes it even more difficult for them to climb the socioeconomic ladder.

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