How does the essay "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" impact feminist studies?

Laura Mulvey’s essay could impact feminist studies in intricate and maybe even subversive ways. It could impact how feminists think about movies. If film is centered on objectification, perhaps movies will always be sexist no matter how conscientious they’ve allegedly become. Conversely, if every audience member has the power to be the objectifier and voyeur, maybe movies, in a way, show that women and men are in fact equal.

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Laura Mulvey’s thought-provoking essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” connects to feminist studies since it highlights how general ideas and notions about gender are reflected in movies.

As for how it impacts feminist studies, that’s up to you or whoever is gauging the impact. I’d say that Mulvey’s essay could...

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Laura Mulvey’s thought-provoking essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” connects to feminist studies since it highlights how general ideas and notions about gender are reflected in movies.

As for how it impacts feminist studies, that’s up to you or whoever is gauging the impact. I’d say that Mulvey’s essay could have quite an impact on feminist studies, particularly on the relationship between feminism and movies.

Remember, Mulvey says that one of the main pleasures of watching movies is objectification, or what Sigmund Freud calls “scopophilia.” The primary object is the beautiful woman. It doesn’t matter how “glamorous” the male movie star might be, the male movie star, being male, can’t be an object. He represents the ego.

The objectification of women and the supremacy of men is a common theme among feminist studies. I could say Mulvey complicates that formula a bit by turning her attention to the movie audience. If almost everyone in the audience is doing the objectifying, that means women are objectifying other women, since women watch movies too.

More so, if women are capable of gazing and objectifying, it seems reasonable to suggest that women can hold the same kind of power typically assigned to men. It also seems plausible to suggest that women can be capable of the same kind of sexist behaviors as men.

Mulvey’s essay might also impact feminist studies in connection to media. Think about the importance placed on movies right now. There seems to be pressure for movies to reflect a certain set of morals or a specific conscientiousness. Yet if movies are primarily objectifying and voyeuristic, as Mulvey suggests, someone could use Mulvey’s essay to argue that movies are not the best place to address moral issues.

Overall, I think it’d be safe to say Mulvey’s essay brings an intricate and maybe even subversive impact to the general field of feminist studies.

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