How does the end of the story "Fritz" strike you?

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Shock is the most likely first reaction that the reader would have to the story’s ending. After that initial impression passes, the reader will probably look back through the story for clues they may have missed that could have led them to anticipate the discovery. The reader’s impression may be...

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Shock is the most likely first reaction that the reader would have to the story’s ending. After that initial impression passes, the reader will probably look back through the story for clues they may have missed that could have led them to anticipate the discovery. The reader’s impression may be formed, as Jayanto’s memory returned to him, in “bits and pieces.” Another type of reaction would be to question the author’s intentions. Why did Satyajit Ray want to shock the reader? Why did he leave the interpretation up to the reader rather than explaining the child’s death? Such questions may lead to interpreting possible broader meanings. Beyond a specific tale of one man’s memories, which were buried like the doll, the reader could focus on the identities of Indians and Europeans more generally. The author could be making a statement about European colonialism as an element that seems to belong to India’s past but cannot remain buried.

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