How does the creature in Frankenstein view himself?

The creature in Frankenstein views himself as an innately good individual who, having been rejected by the world, has become bitter and drawn to evil deeds.

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In Frankenstein, by the time the creature meets Victor Frankenstein, his creator, several years have passed, and he has come to understand how he is perceived by humans. He has become literate and read several books, including as Paradise Lost , which have given him more insight into...

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In Frankenstein, by the time the creature meets Victor Frankenstein, his creator, several years have passed, and he has come to understand how he is perceived by humans. He has become literate and read several books, including as Paradise Lost, which have given him more insight into his misery.

The creature, for example, knows that he was born good. He reached out to others, such as the De Laceys, in good faith but was rejected again and again because of his appearance. The unhappiness and anguish of being made an outcast has embittered him. As he expresses eloquently to Victor, if he were given love and acceptance (made "happy") he would become his better self:

I was benevolent and good; misery made me a fiend. Make me happy, and I shall again be virtuous.

The creature also understands that it is his ugly and frightening appearance, not his soul, which has caused him to be rejected and miserable. He accuses Victor of cruelty in making him so ugly that he is condemned to utter loneliness:

'Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust? God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemlance. Satan had his companions, fellow-devils, to admire and encourage him; but I am solitary and abhorred

His reading and his examination into his inner nature teach the creature that he is, like others, a mix of good and evil. He understands that if the good side of him is nurtured, he will respond with benevolence and love. However, he also knows that if he cannot find love, his rage will overtake him, causing him to do evil:

There is love in me the likes of which you've never seen. There is rage in me the likes of which should never escape. If I am not satisfied in the one, I will indulge the other.

In sum, the creature has an acute understanding of himself. He knows that he is innately good inside but that his appearance has made him repulsive to others. He knows that what he will become—either good or evil—depends on how the world treats him. If he is treated well, he will turn to good, if not, he will inevitably act out his rage.

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