How does Tennyson compare the old age and young age in "Tithonus?"comparison should go with life view point of old age and young age,their beliefs,their thoughts, their physiological approach,their...

How does Tennyson compare the old age and young age in "Tithonus?"

comparison should go with life view point of old age and young age,their beliefs,their thoughts, their physiological approach,their living thought and potential thought in their mind...............

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thanatassa | College Teacher | (Level 3) Educator Emeritus

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The story of Tithonus, like the story of the Cumaean Sibyl, is one of mortals crossing over boundaries to obtain godlike attributes. This always ends badly, as mortals cannot evade their fate (e.g. Cassandra knows the future but no one believes her, Minos’ food and drink turn to gold, Sibyl and Tithonus cannot die but wither).

The obvious contrast is that Tithonus withers physically and Aurora does not; he becomes tired of life, and she does not.

But the contrast is not so much youth and age but that the goddess, destined to be eternally young and without the fear of mortality lacks emotional complexity and is indifferent to suffering (like the Lotus Eaters or the indifferent tranquil gods of the Epicureans), whereas Tithonus, born mortal, because of the possibility of aging and death being inherent in his nature, suffers and grows in a way Aurora cannot.

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