How does the Surpreme Court case, Brown vs. Board of Education,play a role in the plot of this book? Do you agree with the court's decision?Why/ynot?based on Warriors Don't Cry

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kimfuji | College Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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The case Brown Vs the Board of Education was monumental in ending segregation because it dismantled the opposing sides argument, that separate is equal. Since Brown won, integration was seen as the best way for blacks to get a good education, because the rights of all people is to get an equal eduaction.

In Melba Beals' book Warriors Don't Cry, the fifteen year oldĀ  shares her experiences as teenager among black students who went to Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957. She suffered all the violence of the civil rights movement. She learned to be a warrior, to be strong. She didn't belive she was a strong person but told herself she was, to survive. She changes from a scared girl to a warrior who is truly fearless and brave.The book's titleĀ  is her command to herself while she lives day in and day out at the integrated high school. However as she grows older she realizes the sacrifices she made, in taking a stand. She ignored the tender and accepting part of herself. She is glad she did what she did; howver she can see how it changed her and the true sacrifice she made.

The court's decision made it possibe for integration. Because of the court's decision, the high school in Little Rock was integrated; and that school symbolized all the changes of the civil rights movement, with all it's mixed emotions and violence.

The court's decision was right when you realize that when education is separate and one group of those educated, like poor black people, have poor classrooms and less educated teachers, it is no wonder why they stressed integration. On the other hand, it was very difficult during those early years of the civil rights movement when the young people had to suffered the brunt of people's mixed feelings about the movement.

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