How does Stephen Crane use personification and zoomorphism in his short story?

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The Palace Hotel is described in the first paragraph as being the same shade of blue as "the legs of a certain bird that makes it bright in any surroundings." This makes the hotel itself seem "always loud and screaming," brash and confident against the winter sky. The opposite effect...

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The Palace Hotel is described in the first paragraph as being the same shade of blue as "the legs of a certain bird that makes it bright in any surroundings." This makes the hotel itself seem "always loud and screaming," brash and confident against the winter sky. The opposite effect is achieved within, however, when the daughters of the house are described as approaching and scurrying away "as carefully as rabbits."

During the fight, the cowboy is shown leaping forward "with the speed of a wild horse," emphasizing his brutality and power. The description also differentiates him and his world from the frightened rabbits in the hotel.

Perhaps the most striking effect, however, is achieved by the reverse personification or chremamorphism in the story. The cowboy is rock-like in his stoic immobility before the fight, but it is Johnnie's body, by contrast, that falls away "like a stone" when he is beaten.

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