How does Steinbeck present the theme of power in the novel "Of Mice and Men"?- through the characters and relationships - through the way he structures the novel - through the words that...

How does Steinbeck present the theme of power in the novel "Of Mice and Men"?

- through the characters and relationships

- through the way he structures the novel

- through the words that steinbeck has used to describe the characters

- through the setting in the novel

Asked on by jojo3888

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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The kind of in-depth answer you're probably looking for that addresses all of those elements really isn't possible in the 90 word space we have, but I can point you in the right direction.

Think of power in personal relationships.  For example,  Slim and Curley's father all have social power in that they are in positions of authority.  Everyone on the ranch has authority over Crooks, as a segregated, second-class citizen in the America of the 1930s.  Curley has authority over his wife, since this was long before women achieved some social equality.  These all represent one kind of power.

Another kind of power is economic power.  Curley's Dad owns the ranch, and can fire workers at will, and is the one who pays them each month.  He is wealthy while the workers are living month to month.

The story reinforces these themes of power constantly, so it is the central premise of the book.

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