How does Shakespeare Reveal Macbeth’s State of Mind in the Banquet Scene? (Act 3 Scene 4)  I am really stuck on this and i need a quote and i am not sure how shakespeare has revealed macebth's...

How does Shakespeare Reveal Macbeth’s State of Mind in the Banquet Scene? (Act 3 Scene 4)

 

I am really stuck on this and i need a quote and i am not sure how shakespeare has revealed macebth's state of mind.

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lsumner | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

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In Act III, Scene IV, Macbeth appears to be a most receptive host in the beginning, welcoming everyone with warmest of receptions:

You know the seating order according to your titles. Sit down. To the first
And the last, a hearty welcome.

Then things change. Macbeth begins hallucinating. When Ross insists that Macbeth be seated, Macbeth claims that the table is full. He sees Banquo sitting in his place of honor. Lady Macbeth tries to cover up Macbeth's bizarre behavior. She tries ease the people's minds by saying that Macbeth has suffered like this from youth. She encourages everyone to ignore him:

Sit, worthy friends. My lord is often this way,
And has been from his youth. I beg you, stay seated.
The fit is momentary; in a minute,
He will again be well. If pay attention to him,
You shall offend him, and embarrass him.
Eat and ignore him. Are you a man?

To this question, Macbeth answers that he is a man, a bold one:

Yes, and a bold one, that has the courage to look on
A sight which might shock the devil.

Clearly, Macbeth is losing his sanity. He is overcome with the guilt of killing King Duncan and having had Banquo murdered. He claims he can see someone:

I beg you, see there! Behold! Look! Lo! What do you say?
Why, what do I care? If you can nod, speak too.
If mortuaries and our graves must send
Those that we bury back, our tombs
Shall be the stomachs of birds.

Lady Macbeth questions Macbeth about the vision that he sees. He claims to have seen someone:

As I stand here, I saw him.

Macbeth continues to share his shocking vision. He claims that he can see a ghost who should be dead:

The time has been,
That, when the brains were out, the man would die,
And that was the end of it. But now they rise again,
With twenty mortal murders on their crowns,
And push us from our stools. This ghost is more strange
Than such a murder is.

Macbeth swears that he can see Banquo:

Begone! And get out of my sight! Let the earth hide you!
There is no marrow in your bones; your blood is cold.
You have no sight in those eyes
That you stare with!

Macbeth confides in Lady Macbeth that he is so far gone into madness:

I am now so far
Stepped in blood that, if I don’t wade in it any more,
It doesn’t matter if I am getting out of it or going over it.
I have strange things in my head that need to be figured out,
Which must be done quickly before others look at them closely.

To this Lady Macbeth tells Macbeth that he needs rest:

You need to sleep.

Sources:

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