How does Shakespeare present family tension in Act 3, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet?Would Be Sooo Helpful If You Included Thigs Like Language, Context, Authors Intention & Audience.Would Be...

How does Shakespeare present family tension in Act 3, Scene 5 of Romeo and Juliet?

Would Be Sooo Helpful If You Included Thigs Like Language, Context, Authors Intention & Audience.
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noahvox2 | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

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In Act 3, Scene 5, of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, the audience encounters the two young lovers in the orchard belonging to the Capulets. At the end of Act 2, Friar Laurence married Romeo and Juliet. The marriage is still unknown to Juliet's parents, although her Nurse has been aware of the situation for some time.

Act 3 opened with the fight between the Montagues and Capulets in the streets of Verona, a fight that resulted in Romeo killing Tybalt. So, in addition to the tension that already existed between the Montagues and Capulets, Romeo has now killed the cousin of his wife, an act which leads Verona's prince to banish Romeo. An arrangement, however, is made that will allow the two to meet before Romeo leaves town.

Thus, by the time of this final scene of Act 3, tension is already high with Juliet's cousin dead, killed by her husband, who is now facing exile. After Romeo and Juliet meet in the first half of this scene, Lady Capulet enters and provides Juliet with two pieces of information. First, she is going to try to have Romeo poisoned; second, Juliet will soon be marrying Paris. Obviously, Juliet is upset by this news and expresses her displeasure at this marriage to her mother.

After Juliet's encounter with her mother, we witness harsh words with her father, who threatens to kick her out of the house and disown her if she does not marry Paris. In open conflict with her father, Juliet tries to get some help from her mother, but encounters opposition on that front. Even the Nurse is of no help at this point, as she advises Juliet to forget about Romeo and marry Paris.

Thus, in this final scene of Act 3, Juliet is beginning to experience an exile of her own. She is in open rebellion against her mother and father and thus faces a cruel future if she will not be obedient.

But, as you will not wed, I'll pardon you:
Graze where you will you shall not house with me:
Look to't, think on't, I do not use to jest.
Thursday is near; lay hand on heart, advise:
An you be mine, I'll give you to my friend;
And you be not, hang, beg, starve, die in
the streets,
For, by my soul, I'll ne'er acknowledge thee,
Nor what is mine shall never do thee good:

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