How does Shakespeare show anger throughout the play Romeo and Juliet?

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Anger in this play is almost entirely generated by the feud between the Montagues and Capulets. The feud literally destroys lives. Events comes to a head in Act III on a hot day in the streets of Verona. Romeo, now secretly married to Juliet, gets dragged into a conflict he wants badly to avoid. When he tries to step between Mercutio and Tybalt to stop a fight, Tybalt stabs and mortally wounds Mercutio. The dying Mercutio cries out in anger at the feud that has cost him his life: “A plague o’ both your houses.”

Romeo is so deeply angered by the death of his dear friend Mercutio that he, in turn, kills Tybalt.

When Juliet hears of the death of her beloved cousin Tybalt, her rage almost consumes her. She lashes out with great anger at Romeo, saying:

A damnèd saint, an honorable villain!

O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?
 
In other words, she believes only...

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